The Legacy of Earth Released!

legacy_cover_500

Having finally escaped the gravity well of Earth, humanity began to spread out, and living in space became much more practical thanks to a handful of critical technologies–fusion power, faster-than-light communication, artificial gravity, automated mining, and advanced construction, to name a few. For many, living in space was as comfortable as living on Earth. Corporations, in the meantime, realizing the potential profits of space industry, scrambled to get into orbit. And with such rapid expansion came heavy competition … and piracy.

Dallas is a 22-year-old, non-organic, “Next-Gen” human with too much energy and not enough challenge in his life. Seeking fame, fortune, and adventure, he joined the military–the U.N. Security Council Defense Force. With rampant piracy interfering with trade, the UNSC Navy commissioned a space fleet in response. Two rushed space cruisers, three unfinished hulls, and a lot of bugs later, the fledgling fleet began its interdiction patrol.

As if piracy wasn’t bad enough, an interstellar neighbor has taken an interest in the “upstart” humans….

Get Your Copy on Amazon

 

Similar Posts

  • Review: Pebble in the Sky (0)
    Pebble in the Sky by Isaac Asimov My rating: 4 of 5 stars Very satisfying old Asimov, with a solid plot and good action that moves along. My only complaint is the rather drawn-out […]
  • Review: Algorithm (0)
    Algorithm by Arthur M. Doweyko My rating: 3 of 5 stars Well written story of intrigue surrounding an ancient artifact that pre-dates human civilization and hints at panspermia theory. […]
  • Review: Hull Zero Three (0)
    Hull Zero Three by Greg Bear My rating: 4 of 5 stars I enjoyed this book, which reminded me of "classic" Greg Bear--a good thing. But, there were parts that I felt were nonsensical and […]
  • Super-intelligent Robots? (0)
    A friend shared this terrific article with me today: The Dominant Life Form in the Cosmos Is Probably Superintelligent Robots which, of course, I found to be wonderfully relevant […]
  • Permanent Suspension of Disbelief (0)
    I get lost easily and often. Not the sort of lost where a GPS or a map would help, and not the sort of Lost where I find myself on a strange island being ever-redesigned by writers who […]

Leave a Reply