Review: Ship of the Line

Ship of the LineShip of the Line by Diane Carey
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Dreadful nonsense with terribly cliched Klingon motivations and unlikely (read: no SoD) events involving deus ex machina time travel. I don’t think I’ve ever read a Trek book quite this bad before, was surprised, because I know I’ve read Diane Carey before. What is this rubbish, anyway? I regret buying the hardcover and hanging onto it for so many years before reading it. Really just a throw-away story that should have been rejected by the publisher.

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Review: Revolt in 2100

Revolt in 2100Revolt in 2100 by Robert A. Heinlein
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This book is a collection containing the novella “If This Goes On” followed by shorts “Coventry” and “Misfit.” I was disappointed when the novella ended abruptly, with a decent ending but not worthy of the build up and prior character development which seems wasted. Heinlein should have turned this into a full novel, it was that good–about an alternate America ruled by a religious dictatorship, and how people feared the Prophet and “sin”. This I can relate to at a personal level. I understand, from the biography, that Heinlein dealt with it as well in his life, growing up in the Bible belt, parents heavily involved in their church. Just wish it had lasted longer…

The two follow-up stories have absolutely nothing to do with the novella and can be skipped by all but Heinlein completists as they are out of place, and I’m not even sure why they are here–to fill pages, no doubt.

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Review: Fallout 3: Prima Official Game Guide

Fallout 3: Prima Official Game GuideFallout 3: Prima Official Game Guide by David Hodgson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Excellent guide. I used it back in 2008 when I last played the game, and misplaced it, so I bought another copy this month when I started another game of Fallout 3.

Now, turns out, I won’t be able to play 4 for a while, since I still haven’t decided whether to buy an Xbox One or go the PC route. Maybe with a Steam Link, but that is iffy too.

Well, this is an excellent guide book–just be sure to use the table of contents, as there is no index. Chapters are conveniently named by the quest names for easy lookup.

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Review: A Clash of Kings

A Clash of KingsA Clash of Kings by George R.R. Martin
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Drags and drags and drags and drags and drags, infinity…

I so enjoyed the first novel, gobbled it up, and jumped right into this one, then stalled. Quit reading for a couple months–so much good stuff to read, after all–then returned to it, and slogged through it. But let me tell you, it was not easy going.

I was bored out of my mind and now I really wonder whether GRRM will ever finished this series, because there’s no significant movement in this novel. And from what I’ve heard, little movement in the following novels as well. In fact, someone mentioned that book #5 goes BACK to the start of the timeline in book #4, and resumes from there with a different character!

Such overrated garbage… This is not “America’s Tolkien”. Ugh…

Just, people moving around, here and there, once in a while someone dies, and everyone keeps on moving here and there, and the other place, again without anything happening. BORING!! Not reading any more of this dreadfully dull series.

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Review: The Door Into Summer

The Door Into SummerThe Door Into Summer by Robert A. Heinlein
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A mediocre time travel story by Heinlein, definitely not a high mark in his career.

I kept getting lost while reading because it just sort of drummed on and on, and a couple times thought I’d lost my page.

The story explores two different forms of time travel, and really just doesn’t introduce anything compelling. There’s a ho-hum physicist who just happens to have a working time machine but no one seems to care–except for Dan, the protagonist. Convenient.

Heinlein was way off the mark on his future predictions, too. Can’t fault him for that, but that makes the story even less compelling today.

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Review: Batman, Vol. 4: Zero Year – Secret City

Batman, Vol. 4: Zero Year - Secret CityBatman, Vol. 4: Zero Year – Secret City by Scott Snyder
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I had this marked as Read due to the individual comics which I subscribed to last year (and then stopped at issue 23–decided that I prefer the GNs over collecting comics). So, I picked up this in hardcover format last week, and it was TERRIFIC!

I was able to finish the story, too, since last year when I quit reading Batman, I only got through about half of this book (in comic book format), so it was a pleasure to finish it.

Now, I can see that Vol 5 continues the Zero Year, which is a surprise–these story arc usually only go 6 issues, but this one ran 12. Boo to DC for not putting them into one larger book! But, since I get these used for only about $10, I don’t mind.

Recently, I’ve finally started going hardcover and really enjoy the quality of HC GNs. Although, it’s worth saying that DC and Marvel could learn a thing or two from Image book quality.

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Review: The Walking Dead, Vol. 06: This Sorrowful Life

The Walking Dead, Vol. 06: This Sorrowful LifeThe Walking Dead, Vol. 06: This Sorrowful Life by Robert Kirkman
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Excellent storytelling. Lots of quite graphic violence as to be expected. There was one scene in this volume that caused me to turn away for the FIRST TIME since reading TWD! It was bad, but I was surprised at my own reaction. I enjoy suspenseful horror, not graphic bloody chunks. However, that doesn’t warrant a star.

This was the last “Volume” titled GN I bought before deciding to switch to the better “Book” titled hardcovers. This volume is included in Book 5. So, I’ll bet getting that book soon and will just re-read the story.

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Don’t Feed The Bad Wolf

Wolf

I think it should be illegal to report bad news without a solution to the problem included in the report. We’re inundated with negativity to such a degree in the world today, what are kids supposed to think about the future other than death, destruction, starvation, plague, and zombies?

As a culture, we’re obsessed with the apocalypse and a dystopian future. Writers are cashing in on the morbid fascination with death that permeates our culture. And what gets the funding today? Follow the money, what is congress voting for and against? I’m just tired of the doom & gloom news hitting us every day.

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